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Manifesto

WHAT HAPPENS ACROSS TOWN, IN SANTA FE, OR IN WASHINGTON MATTERS, but what happens in your neighborhood more directly dictates your quality of life. Clean streets, well-maintained parks, competent first responders, plentiful cultural offerings, smart social services, well-designed transport networks, good schools, thoughtfully-implemented development, inviting coffee shops – the proximity and quality of these neighborhood-level basics can make or break your property value, your career, your relationships, and even your physical and mental health. How we get along with each other, how we watch out for each other, and whether we stick together – these things are mostly decided at a the neighborhood level.

You probably want to know what’s going on in your neighborhood – out of a need to make important, well-informed decisions, a fear of missing out, a longing for the benefits of knowing your neighbors, or sheer curiosity. But the flow of information is patchy at best. From TV we get crime news and other small outrages and novelties pulled more-or-less at random from across a vast metro area. From what little remains of the traditional newspaper business we get the highlights from the City Council, but the model no longer seems to allow for frequent deep dives into neighborhoods. And the best we can hope to get from social media are reports of lost pets and hot tips on good lawn care companies.

DAN is a publication for people who want to really know their neighborhood. Within our Downtown coverage zone, we strive to attend every neighborhood association meeting, as well as several city advisory boards and commissions that shape the look and feel of our streets, trails, transit, and parks. We tell you what’s happening, and go in depth on the issues behind those headlines. We collect and present highly localized data on traffic congestion, gas prices, bus ridership, crime, real estate, ground water, and the Rio Grande, as well as figures that monitor the health of our community centers, our museums, our events centers, and the BioPark. We monitor the vast array of Downtown non-profit organizations that create jobs in and often anchor our neighborhoods. We collect the meager scraps about Downtown from other media outlets and wrap them up into regularly-delivered packages. We seek out enlightening feature stories that spotlight Downtown’s diverse and fascinating people. And we literally patrol the streets, on the prowl for any and all matters that deserve further investigation.

DAN is not for everyone. If you’re satisfied with crime stories and marathon weather reports, fear not: You will find what you’re looking for elsewhere, probably at no cost. But if you’re in the market for coverage that’s smart, relevant, fresh, and more local than you ever thought possible, start your free trial right now.